Extreme weather damage experienced by 1 in 5 Canadians: survey

0
31

More than one in 5 Canadians say both they, a member of the family or a detailed good friend experienced property damage or loss as a result of excessive weather in the previous yr, in line with a brand new survey.

A Nanos ballot carried out for CTV News discovered Atlantic residents have been considerably extra prone to have experienced property damage or loss as a result of excessive weather, with seven in ten responding that both they (38 per cent) or a member of the family or shut good friend (33 per cent) had in the previous 12 months.

This chart reveals the speed at which Canadians have experienced property damage or loss as a result of excessive weather in the previous 12 months, in line with a latest survey by Nanos Research. (Nanos Research survey for CTV News)

Quebec had the bottom proportion of residents reply that they or a member of the family or shut good friend had experienced property damage, at 4.1 per cent, adopted by British Columbia, Ontario and the Prairie provinces. Men and ladies have been equally prone to say that they had experienced damage – at 10.3 and 10.2 per cent respectively – although ladies have been barely extra prone to say a member of the family or shut good friend had experienced it.

The information bears out local weather scientists’ warnings that Atlantic Canada is very susceptible to damage triggered by coastal storms that deliver highly effective wind gusts, heavy rain and storm surges. Climate change is worsening these dangers.

(*1*)This chart reveals the speed at which individuals in Atlantic Canada have experienced property damage or loss as a result of excessive weather in the previous 12 months, in line with a latest survey by Nanos Research. (Nanos Research survey for CTV News)

When post-tropical storm Fiona pummelled Newfoundland and Labrador, Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick on Sept. 24, it triggered between $300 and $700 million in insured losses. The storm ripped the roofs of homes, washed away roads and swept homes and folks into the ocean. Some communities – like Shediac, N.B.– say it might take till subsequent spring to complete cleansing up after the storm.

PREVENTATIVE MEASURES

In some instances, preventative measures can assist mitigate loss and damage as a result of excessive weather occasions resembling Fiona. According to the Nanos survey, nonetheless, most Canadians don’t take these measures.

The survey discovered barely greater than three in 4 Canadians say they’ve carried out nothing to assist defend their property from damage towards excessive weather in the previous 12 months.

Atlantic Canadians have been extra probably than most to have taken precautions resembling including or bettering drainage and improving their roofs. More than one in 4 stated that they had cleared or trimmed timber and cleared or secured out of doors gadgets and furnishings.

METHODOLOGY

Nanos Research is a public opinion analysis agency.

Nanos carried out an RDD twin body (land and cell traces) hybrid phone and on-line random survey of 1,037 Canadians, 18 years of age or older, between Sept. 30 and Oct. 3 , 2022 as a part of an omnibus survey. (*5*) have been randomly recruited by phone utilizing stay brokers and administered a survey on-line. The pattern included each land and cell traces throughout Canada. The outcomes have been statistically checked and weighted by age and gender utilizing the newest Census data and the pattern is geographically stratified to be consultant of Canada.

Individuals randomly known as utilizing random digit dialling with a most of 5 name backs. The margin of error for this survey is 3.1 proportion factors, 19 instances out of 20. This examine was commissioned by CTV News and the analysis was carried out by Nanos Research. 

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here